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Early Black Media, 1918–1924: Print Pioneers in Britain (Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media) by [Jane L. Chapman]

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Early Black Media, 1918–1924: Print Pioneers in Britain (Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media) 1st ed. 2019 Edition, Kindle Edition


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Review

“One of the central contributions of Early Black Media is its specificity. Chapman offers … insight into both the racialized perspective of mainstream publications and the developing race consciousness evident in African and Afro-Caribbean periodicals. Chapman’s focus on the period from 1919 to 1924 allows her to trace the relationship between the British press and the media that emerged simultaneously in other national contexts, supporting her claim that Black consciousness developed as a transnational phenomenon.” (Caryn Murphy, Journal of British Studies, Vol. 60 (3), July, 2021)

--This text refers to the hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover

This book represents the first systematic attempt to analyse media and public communications published in Britain by people of African and Afro-Caribbean origin during the aftermaths of war, presenting an in-depth study of print publications for the period 1919-1924. This was a period of post-conflict readjustment that experienced a transnational surge in special interest newspapers and periodicals, including visual discourse. This study provides evidence that the aftermath of war needs to be given more attention as a distinctly defined period of post-conflict adjustment in which individual voices should be highlighted. As such it forms part of a continuing imperative to re-discover and recuperate black history, adding to the body of research on the aftermaths of The First World War, black studies, and the origins of diaspora.
Jane L. Chapman analyses how the newspapers of black communities act as a record of conflict memory, and specifically how physical and political oppression was understood by members of the African Caribbean community. Pioneering black activist journalism demonstrates opinions on either empowerment or disempowerment, visibility, self-esteem, and economic struggles for survival.
--This text refers to the hardcover edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B0814FSGSR
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Palgrave Pivot; 1st ed. 2019 edition (Nov. 6 2019)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 487 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 103 pages

About the author

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Jane Chapman has been illustrating children's books for over twenty-five years. She loves to paint snow, especially when the weather is hot, but she gets very cross with her cat when he sits in her paint.

Jane lives in south-west England with her two sons.

You can see more of her work at www.janekchapman.com

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