Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed Audible Audiobook – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 20,902 ratings

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Product details

Listening Length 14 hours and 21 minutes
Author Lori Gottlieb
Narrator Brittany Pressley
Audible.ca Release Date April 02 2019
Publisher Audible Studios
Program Type Audiobook
Version Unabridged
Language English
ASIN B07PYHC9QR
Best Sellers Rank #28 in Audible Books & Originals (See Top 100 in Audible Books & Originals)
#1 in Love & Romance (Audible Books & Originals)
#1 in Psychotherapy (Books)
#2 in Love & Romance (Books)

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5
20,902 global ratings

Top reviews from Canada

Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on November 18, 2019
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15 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on January 16, 2022
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2 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on April 24, 2022
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3.0 out of 5 stars Typography errors &etc.
By Amazon Customer on April 24, 2022
I know it's quite a late review. First, because it's Christmas time when I received the book, so I don't want to write a bad review during a happy time. Second, English is not my first language, it took me quite a while to finish reading the book and finally I finished and could find a time to write the review. Overall, I like the book itself, Lori is a good story teller and the information is useful and interesting, even my favourite psychologist author is Irvin D. Yalom. So the three stars are for the book. I am quite disappointed because there are four pages of typography errors, plus there are several pages other problem(See the snapshots as evidence). The book is marked "NEW" condition, but with so many problems. I know the staff won't check every book carefully before they pack, but with so many errors, it's quite difficult to ignore.
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3 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on December 16, 2019
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4 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on February 25, 2022
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One person found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on August 7, 2019
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10 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on May 11, 2020
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One person found this helpful
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Reviewed in Canada 🇨🇦 on December 11, 2020
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Top reviews from other countries

Surbhi Sinha
5.0 out of 5 stars This is not a self help book, it's even better!
Reviewed in India 🇮🇳 on May 21, 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars This is not a self help book, it's even better!
Reviewed in India 🇮🇳 on May 21, 2020
I started reading Maybe You Should Talk to Someone to be a part of a read-along and participate in it’s discussions. Here’s a thing I've realized about read-along’s – while they’re really good for you to read through a book quickly and have in-depth conversations about them, sometimes it may pull you out of your depth and turns out that this one was a bit too ambitious for me. As I read the book it occurred to me that that's okay and I’m quite glad to have finished the book at my own pace. It’s also the first time that I was reading two books simultaneously and now I have come to know myself better and also understood why I am a mono-reader – it’s because I enjoy savoring the story of an entire book before I move on to the next.

Despite what the title may suggest, Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is NOT a self-help book. It isn’t a book where the author imposes their idea of something on you AND it definitely is NOT a book asking you to go see a therapist! It’s rather a memoir of the author and therapist – Lori Gottlieb. It’s a narrative about her sessions with her therapist along with the journey of some of her patient’s – an obnoxious TV show writer, an alcoholic, a dying newly wed and a 70 year old depressed artist.

This week is mental health awareness week and the title of the book subtly addresses the stigma around mental health, subtly suggesting that if you feel like you need help, there’s nothing wrong in asking for it. Who you ask that help from is entirely up to you.

There were many enlightening moments in the book for me. The emotions that one faces in life are quite similar to those faced by many other’s as well. We're different people but all human, different OS on similar hardware. At times, the questions and feelings expressed by each patient and Lori had me subconsciously acknowledging that emotion too or it had me asking the same questions to myself. Some times it would also feel as if the author was calling me out on some of my toxic behaviors too.

In my opinion, the book is not to convince anyone to go see a therapist; rather it’s to help us question and understand our own entire humanity through the author’s journey. As the patient’s progressed in their journey’s I too became more affirmed that whenever I do need help, I will always have an option, and more importantly the choice, to to ask for it – which to me seems like the secondary intent of this memoir. I could be wrong about all of this but what I really want to say is that after quite a prolonged period, I’ve found a profound read and I am giving it nothing less than 5 bookmarks!
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64 people found this helpful
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Russell Fanelli
5.0 out of 5 stars Love Wins
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on March 20, 2019
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881 people found this helpful
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Helena
1.0 out of 5 stars A waste of (a lot of) your time
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on April 21, 2019
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Anukriti chaturvedi
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging & Insightful. A must read to understand therapy better.
Reviewed in India 🇮🇳 on February 3, 2021
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5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging & Insightful. A must read to understand therapy better.
Reviewed in India 🇮🇳 on February 3, 2021
"Besides, aren't therapists, of all people, supposed to have their lives together?”

As I turn the last page of the book, there's this sort of lightness in my chest and dampness on my face. I can't help smiling and ruminate about what a therapeutic experienced l'd.

As opposed to what pop culture might make us believe, therapy is not about just lying on the couch, spilling out everything to a therapist. Therapy is a process, an arduous journey. There needs to be an establishment of some sort of trust first and a therapist is not a vending machine, that they give an answer on the platter on Day 1.

Why are we so scared of discussing our mental state of mind, the invisible storm brewing in our heads but are quick to divulge our physical health issues and even sex lives? is what Lori starts of with.

Through the medium of her 4 clients, their lives and painful experiences, along with her own experience with therapy, Lori Gottlieb, a psychotherapist, weaves an utterly human narrative, peeling back layers in order to help her patients reach the deepest and darkest parts of themselves and the deep rooted insecurities, which they are too afraid to confront. She gently steers them in the right direction, making them make sense of their jumbled up thought processes, helping them overcome the obstacles and convincing them that their worth is not associated with the choices they've made. In this manner, she compels the readers to the same.

She gives us a glimpse into the nature of a therapist's workings, as well as what people perceive of her, teaching us a lot about compassion and empathy, not only with others but also ourselves, and making us understand our relationship with others around us. She also touches upon the topic of seeking therapy on the basis of gender, in a patriarchal society like ours.

It's an absolutely riveting and intimate book, eloquently put together, relatable and hilarious, making you either laugh out loud or chuckling ever so often and making you feel all sorts of emotions as you cheer for everyone in the book and is not at all preachy. She even touches upon a few disorders and common terms in therapy, explaining them quite succinctly and theories by certain scholars.

"As I heal inside, I'm also becoming more adept at healing others.”

In the end I would just like to say

You are valid
You matter
You are enough
You are appreciated and loved.
Whatever you are going through right now, will pass soon so just hang in there and keep fighting and going after things you want.
Please do seek help if you feel like.
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36 people found this helpful
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Sarah
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific read. Thought provoking. Humorous.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on May 11, 2019
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19 people found this helpful
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