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The Oligarchs: Wealth And Power In The New Russia Hardcover – Feb. 12 2002

4.4 out of 5 stars 162 ratings

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From Library Journal

There seems to be little question that the handful of men who became wealthy and powerful after the demise of the Soviet Union were greedy to the point of being criminal. Matthew Brzezinski's Casino Moscow, Chystia Freeland's Sale of the Century: Russia's Wild Ride from Communism to Capitalism, and Paul Klebnikov's Godfather of the Kremlin: Boris Berezovsky and the Looting of Russia do a good job of documenting the chicanery. What shaped the character of the so-called oligarchs? How did the decaying Soviet system influence such a diverse group of men? Hoffman, former Moscow bureau chief for the Washington Post, digs into the background of the six main oligarchs e.g., Boris Berezovsky of the All Russian Automobile Alliance (AVVA), one of Vladimir Putin's main backers, and Anatoly Chubias, former chair of Gazprom and founder of NTV (Novoe Televidenie, or "New Television") identifying the events that made each of them so predatory and so influential. Several characteristics are common to each. They all lived restless lives. They began to take advantage of the decaying system by starting capitalist ventures called "co-ops." They were experts at building social capital among the powerful government leaders. And, as Hoffman claims, most significantly, each man had "an ability to change." The book is not a prescriptive work but a fine descriptive volume that illuminates current Russian politics and finance. Recommended for public and academic libraries. Harry Willems, Southeast Kansas Lib. Syst., Iola
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Hoffman makes the tale of the men's rise and fall a masterful blend of adventure and serious, informed analysis." -- Foreign Affairs, May/June 2002

"an irresistible tale...one of the most vivid and well-researched accounts...of this tumultuous period in recent Russian history." --
Christian Caryl, Newsweek International Edition, March 11, 2002

"dramatic and comprehensive...What makes this account both devastating and entertaining is the way Hoffman has pieced it together..." --
New York Times Book Review, April 28, 2002

"one the most wide-ranging and sober...descriptions of the oligarchs during the painful past decade of change in Russia." --
Financial Times, March 23, 2002

Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ PublicAffairs; 1st edition (Feb. 12 2002)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 576 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1586480014
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1586480011
  • Item weight ‏ : ‎ 994 g
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 16.51 x 4.45 x 24.77 cm
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.4 out of 5 stars 162 ratings

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davidehoffman.com

David E. Hoffman is Contributing Editor at the Washington Post and a member of the Editorial board. In 1982, he joined The Washington Post to cover Presidents Reagan and Bush. Later, he was diplomatic correspondent, then served as Jerusalem correspondent, covering the Oslo peace accords. From 1995 to 2001, he served as Moscow bureau chief. On returning to Washington in 2001, he was Foreign editor and then Assistant Managing Editor for Foreign news. He has been a correspondent for the FRONTLINE documentaries "Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria" (2013), "The Trouble With Antibiotics" (2014) and "The Trouble with Chicken" (2015) and a reporter for “Putin’s Revenge,” (2017).

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
4.4 out of 5
162 global ratings

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MissingButton
1.0 out of 5 stars Monotonous
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on April 29, 2018
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Mash
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent remedy for 'Putin fatigue'.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on March 27, 2015
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Siriam
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant synopsis of what happend and why it all went wrong
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on December 11, 2003
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Diane Byett
5.0 out of 5 stars Great insight into the Oligarchs
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on January 23, 2019
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Beverley
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent but not a quick read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom 🇬🇧 on July 13, 2018
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